Guinness Logic

Anyone who drinks Guinness regularly becomes a philosopher.  I’m not sure if it’s a result of sitting there, staring at the glass, waiting because it takes so long for the head to reduce or what, but it just happens.  Drink enough Guinness in a sitting and you have flashes of brilliance, as evidenced by Greg’s napkin below:

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What is Art?

When I started pursuing a second degree at the local art college a couple of years ago I was introduced to the term “creatives”.  To be honest, it really rubbed me the wrong way, like it was a solution looking for a problem.  Were we too cool for “artist”?  Were only some people cool enough to be called artist?  Everyone else had to be a “creative”?

I went out for drinks the other night and sat at the bar with the coolest bartender.  When they’re really good, I could sit there for hours talking to them.  He was making me drinks that weren’t on the menu, then we were kind of inventing drinks together.  Is that art?  Is that being creative?  He was super passionate about his trade.  He’s educated himself, he experiments and he creates and he loves interacting with his audience.  And I believe art can be found in lots of places.  “Is it a science or an art?” pops up frequently in the engineering world.  What’s your take?

He made that butterfly to sit on the rim of the glass btw!

I love the hash work for shading in this
I love the hash work for shading in this

Self Portrait Triadic PortraitI sit next to this incredibly talented artist in class.  His name is Jeremy Jefferson and it’s so frustrating to see how he’s good at everything he tries.  Sketches.  Paints.  Collages.  Computer Graphics.  He does it all.  These are some drawings from a recent class project.  It’ll be neat to see what this guy does, but I”m sure it’s going to be great!  Check out his website.

Very Exciting!

Okay, I’m a geek who has done data center moves before.  I’ve been in the trenches, actually un-racking servers and just taking a pair of side cutters to hundreds of rat-nested cables and I’ve also supervised moves.  And, in full disclosure, I’ve utilized Blaine Berger’s services to PM my most successful data center move to date.  So to me, books about data center moves are interesting.

If you’re not an IT person like myself data center moves might not be your cup of tea.  So what’s exciting about this?  Well, a couple of things.  First, the fact that Blaine took the time to recreate the cover of his book on a napkin.  Then the fact that he’s being creative about advertising and the use of social media.  And lastly, the fact that he’s offering the guide at a discounted price for people who get to it thru this site.  My first cross-platform promotion!  So, without further ado:

 

Hi Mac – I’m the author of “What Everybody Ought to Know Before Moving a Data Center” and wanted to shoot you my first napkin submission and my story.

I’m planning my book launch party in Denver to coincide with the book’s debut on Amazon in the first quarter of 2014. While the minutia of that process isn’t important, the catering element triggered a discussion about what to print on the napkin.
Why not share the process, I thought? The $8 off the book offer is real as a thank you to your readers. Feedback welcome from your readers on napkin ideas!

Blaine Berger | President of E-Oasis

Author of “What Everybody Ought to Know Before Moving a Data Center”
napkinbook

Too cool not to share!

I’ll be posting a picture from Chris later this week, but his work is too cool not to share now.

Go look at his gallery at:  http://peterparkerpa.deviantart.com/

Then come back and read more about the awesome dad, here is his intro in his words:

My name is Chris Hughes. I’m 29. I’m a married father of two great kids, ages 9 and 4.
In April 2012, I started drawing on my daughter’s school lunch napkins. The kids were bummed to return “Hop” to our local Blockbuster (yes, we still had one then), and I drew the titular Easter Bunny behind his drum kit on a napkin for my daughter to ease the pain a bit. One thing led to another and now, as she starts fourth grade this month, I’ve drawn more than 200 consecutive daily napkins minus obvious holiday breaks and sick days. Her art teacher even displays them at the beginning of their classes, which is funny to me because I did not fare well in my art school critiques. (I later left the AFA program and switched to a Communications track at another college.)
My son, who starts school for the first time this year, will be getting napkins from the beginning of his school experience. I’m eager to see how long he actually lets me continue it. What a neat metric to count how many days of school we put our kids through!
The napkins are inspired both by my kids’ interests and my own. I’ve tried introducing a lot of 90s television, movies, and video games into their impressionable minds, but we watch a lot of modern shows and play plenty of current generation Nintendo games together. They’re admittedly drawn on fairly cheap paper napkins with thin tip Sharpies, and I changed over to a brush tip marker for the outlines this year.
Drawing daily napkins got me back to creating things every day, which helped rekindle a lost love of graphic design. I operate a pop-culture mashup infused shop at www.society6.com/peterparkerpa (including one design featured at teefury.com last fall) and my personal design blog at peterparkerpa.com.
For the last eight years, I was a journalist in northeastern Pennsylvania. At the end of August, I switched roles and returned to my alma mater, Lackawanna College, as their new manager of web content and news media.
Massive props to my wife who gives me the time to do silly napkin doodles for the kids we both love very much.